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School of Electronic Engineering

Postgraduate Programmes

Guide to Choosing Modules

There are three main considerations when choosing modules for a programme.

  1. Which selection of modules do I need to choose from? Which modules will meet the requirements for my desired qualification and are offered through the mechanism through which I wish to study?
  2. Which modules are most suitable to choose from this selection? Given my background knowledge, which modules will I be capable of achieving and in which order should I take them?
  3. What is my progression rate, study mechanism and corresponding timetable? I wish to undertake the programme part-time, but am unsure of the pace at which to undertake modules? What is the actual timetable for physical lectures? Which modules should I take to optimise my timetable (more applicable to part-time attending students)

1. Which selection of modules do I need to choose from?

To use this facility, select the programme you are interested in completing. The facility will highlight the module requirements for each of the programme titles. Please be aware that it is the students responsibility to choose the correct modules on registration.

Please select a programme to highlight module Requirements:

Module Title Lvl Sem Start Finish Mode Regist.
EE402: Object-oriented Programming for Engineers 8 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
EE450: Communications Theory 8 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
EE452: Wireless and Mobile Communications 8 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
EE453: Image Processing & Analysis with Project 8 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web headset Option
EE463: Solid-State Electronics and Semiconductor Devices 8 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web Option
EE500: Performance of Data Networks 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
EE509: Data Network Protocol Analysis and Simulation 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
EE515: Real-Time Digital Signal Processing 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web Option
EE535: Renewable Energy: Systems, Technology and Economics 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
EE540: HDL/High Level Logic Synthesis 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web info Option
EE559: Fundamentals of Nanoelectronic Technology 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web Option
EE562: Network Programming 9 1 19/09/16 10/12/16 OC/Web videocam Option
 
EE417: Web Application Development 8 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam Option
EE454: Optical Communications System Design 8 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web info Option
EE459: Mechatronic System Simulation & Control 8 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam Option
EE495: Transmission Lines, RF Propagation & Radio Link Design 8 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam info Option
EE497: 3D Interface Technologies 8 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web Option
EE502: DSP (Signal Modelling & Compression) 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web Option
EE506: Fundamentals of Photonic Devices 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam Option
EE507: Entrepreneurship for Engineers 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam Option
EE508: Fundamentals of Device Manufacturing 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web Option
EE513: Connected Embedded Systems 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web Option
EE514: Data Analysis & Machine Learning 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web Option
EE538: Secure Sys Admin and Internetwork Security 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 Campus info Option
EE544: Computer Vision 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam Option
EE552: Broadband Networks 9 2 30/01/17 22/04/17 OC/Web videocam Option
 
EE592: Electronic Systems Project (MEN) 9 - Oct End Sep - Project
EE581: Electronic Systems Project (Nano Tech. Major) 9 - Oct End Sep - Project
EE580: Electronic Systems Project (IoT Major) 9 - Oct End Sep - Project
EE595: Electronic Systems Project (IPA Major) 9 - Oct End Sep - Project
EE593: Telecommunications Eng. Project (MTC) 9 - Oct End Sep - Project
EE596: Telecommunications Project (Networking Major) 9 - Oct End Sep - Project

Note: Module list may be subject to changes/semester switches before the beginning of each academic year. Please bear this in mind when making your module selections.

Two weeks are allowed for examination preparation and two weeks for examination at the end of each semester.

The Project element is only undertaken by students taking a Masters Programme and is assigned in October.  For more information regarding the project please see the pages for Registered Students.


 

2. Which modules are most suitable to choose?

There are no enforced prerequisites in these programmes. However, these modules are Masters level programmes and modules frequently have some expectation of prior student knowledge. Most commonly, the requirements relate to prior mathematics and/or software ability. The following table has been created to give some indication of suggested levels of expected knowledge. Hover your mouse over the icons (Software Knowledge and Mathematics/General Knowledge ) for further information.

Code & Title Prior Knowledge Code & Title Prior Knowledge
EE402: Object-Oriented Programming for Engineers EE417: Web Application Development Software KnowledgeUnderstanding of any functional or object-oriented programming language is recommended. It would be useful (but not essential) to have completed EE402 before this module.
EE451: Mechatronic System Simulation and Control Software KnowledgeSome knowledge of basic programming concepts is strongly recommended; familiarity with MATLAB is advantageous but not required. Mathematics/General KnowledgePrevious experience of basic systems and signals, along with typical undergraduate mathematics (e.g. polynomial and matrix manipulations, calculus, transform theory) is essential EE452: Wireless and Mobile Communication
EE453: Image Processing and Analysis Software KnowledgeThis module will require basic programming skills. A simple to use visual programming environment will be supplied for use with this module. The assignments will focus on the development of robust computer vision solutions rather than programming skills. Mathematics/General KnowledgeBasic undergraduate engineering mathematics (e.g. matrices, vectors, differential equations, Fourier, trigonometry, algebra..) with a particular focus on discrete systems. Selected areas will be revisited throughout the module. EE454: Optical Communications System Design
EE500: Performance of Data Networks EE502: DSP (Signal Modelling and Compression) Software KnowledgeUnderstanding of any functional or object-oriented programming language is recommended. Mathematics/General KnowledgePrevious experience of basic signals and systems theory and polynomial manipulation is strongly recommended.
EE506: Fundamentals of Photonic Devices Mathematics/General KnowledgeBasic undergraduate mathematics expected, including vectors and differential equations. EE507: Entrepreneurship for Engineers
EE509: Data Network Protocol Analysis and Simulation Software KnowledgeA basic knowledge of Java would be useful (but not essential). Mathematics/General KnowledgeAn understanding of basic undergraduate-level probability would be recommended. EE535: Renewable Energy: Systems, Technology and Economics
EE538: Secure Sys Admin and Internetwork Security Software KnowledgeA basic knowledge of computer programming in C or JAVA and the Linux environment is desirable (but not essential). Mathematics/General KnowledgeA basic knowledge of computer networking is desirable (but not essential) in the areas of MAC, IP/TCP/UDP, wired Ethernet, Wireless, Cryptography. EE540: HDL/High Level Logic Synthesis Mathematics/General KnowledgeA basic understanding of logical circuit operations / digital circuits is expected.
EE541: Nano and Microelectronic Device Manufacturing EE544: Computer Vision
EE552: Broadband Networks Software KnowledgeA basic knowledge of C is required to complete the assignments. Mathematics/General KnowledgeSome background in probability theory would be recommended. The necessary theory is covered but not in depth. EE559: Fundamentals of Nanoelectronic Technology Mathematics/General KnowledgeStudents should have studied an upper level (i.e. third- or fourth-year) undergraduate solid-state physics, solid-state electronics, or equivalent course, covering basic quantum mechanics, semiconductor materials, etc. A knowledge of how to solve partial differential equations will be a major advantage.
EE562: Network Programming Software KnowledgeSome basic knowledge of C is necessary, including functional programming and pointers. EE565: Medical Imaging and Visualisation Software KnowledgeThe student should have previous experience with object orientated programming (C++ or Java) Mathematics/General KnowledgeSome of the concepts are based on differential calculus and a previous understanding of this area would be useful.
EE587: Plasma Process Technology EE588: Semiconductor Manufacturing Equipment and Systems

3. What is my progression rate, study mechanism and corresponding timetable?

Students frequently have unique requirements from programmes and we attempt to facilitate these requirements through flexible and dynamic programmes.

3.1 - Progression Rate

Full-time, on-campus students have little difficulty with this question: they are expected to complete the programme in one year, taking four modules per academic semester and their project largely completed over the summer months. The timetable is of interest to these students, as while all effort has been made to ensure that modules do not overlap this may occur in rare circumstances. However, where this occurs, the modules have been made available in a web-based format, enabling students to take any module combinations.

Part-time students have more decisions to make with this question: How quickly am I hoping to complete the programme? How much time can I allocate to my studies? Can I travel to DCU to attend lectures? Can I take fewer modules next year while I work abroad/get married/have children? .... The list goes on.

In short, the rate at which you take modules is almost entirely up to you. The faster the rate at which modules are taken, the quicker the progression. There are two additional considerations to be noted:

  • Foreign students requiring a VISA may have restrictions placed upon them by their VISA (i.e. you will most likely be required to take programmes/modules in a full-time manner)
  • Students may not spend more than FOUR YEARS pursuing a qualification and are expected to demonstrate that they have engaged satisfactorily with the programme from year-to-year.

The time to completion varies depending on the number of modules taken per semester (credits earned) and the type of programme selected.  See the examples in the table below:

Programme TypeSemester 1Semester 2Year TotalCompletion
Masters Full-time4 48 + Project 1 Year
Masters Part-time2 24 + 1/2 Proj 2 Years

This list above is by no means restrictive and many alternatives are available, depending on personal preference.  However, please note that registering for a programme part-time indicates an intention to complete the programme within 2 years - if it is intended to take a longer time to completion,  there may be associated fee implications.  Please contact us for further details.
 

3.2 - Study Mechanism

The principle decision most students will make will be whether to take modules through an on-campus approach or an online approach. The vast majority of modules can be taken through either mechanism, or indeed through a combination of both. Online students are free to attend campus lectures when they wish and on-campus students may participate in the programme entirely through online means if preferred. The following are some suggestions regarding mechanism and progression rate to be considered before selection: 

  • If you can attend on-campus for one year, then a full time Masters should be selected.
     
  • For part-time students, it is recommended that two modules per semester are selected. It has been found that this is the optimal number, which employees find manageable, while proceeding efficiently towards a qualification. In addition, it is recommended that the project would be taken in the second year of study.
     
  • For industry-based part-time students who are able to take a full day of leave from work throughout each semester, it is suggested that two on-campus modules are taken per semester.
     
  • For employees who are able to take a half day of leave from work, which allows for one module to be taken on campus, it is recommended that an additional remote module be taken (via the RACeE mechanism) towards completing a qualification in the optimal time.
     
  • For part-time students who are registered on the Masters Qualifier, it is recommended to complete four modules in the first academic year. If a student meets the minimum transfer requirements, then they will transfer to the Masters in their second year. They can then complete their four remaining modules and a project to complete the programme in two years. This means that, subject to successful transfer, part-time students on the qualifier can complete a Masters in the same time as a part-time student who is accepted directly on to the Masters programme. Note: If the transfer requirements are not met, the student will be unable to transfer to the Masters in their second year and this may result in a third year, as projects are only allocated once per annum in October.
     
  • In the scenario where it is not possible to reach the campus, either through work or location restraints, it is possible that a qualification could be completed using the RACeE mechanism exclusively.  This needs to be negotiated with the programme leader, due to restraints on module selection/projects. It should also be noted that one single half day of attendance is required to complete the exam (per module).

For further details, please visit the Programme Information. Alternatively, visit the case studies, which describe some of the possible scenarios.
 

3.3 - Timetable

To get a better idea of how the lectures are scheduled on a weekly basis, you can use the following Timetabling Tool.

To view the modules for Semester 1 select "MEN" "C" Weeks "1" to "12" and "Day".

For Semester 2 select Weeks "20" to "31" and select "Day and Evening"

* Note: The timetables are set up close to the beginning of each semester, and there may be changes from year to year. At various times of the year, the timetable system may link to the previous semester timetable or will be a work in progress. As a result, there will be some time between Semesters when the timetables are not available or inaccurate. For example, at the beginning of Semester 1, the semester 2 timetable will only represent an indicative timetable from the previous year. It would not be until Semester 2 before the timetable would be updated and finalised.